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OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES AND STUDENT

Instead of using the time for other activities, students spend their free time doing the assignment and study until late at night, which is a good thing, but it is also can be considered as bad things at the same time because they did not aware of their health mentally and physically. Some students might stress with their work and cannot study or do their assignments, lab reports, or presentation properly due to a lack of ideas and inspiration. Other than that, mentally unhealthy will increase the risk of depression, Cardiovascular Disease (CVD), and obesity (Hunt and Eisenberg, 2010). Stay in a room for quiet sometimes is not good for mental health, students need to go out and take some air by doing the outdoor activities

Outdoor recreation is voluntary participation in free time, it occurs outdoors and involves interaction with the natural resources and environment (Mohd et al., 2017). This outdoor activity can give positive values and enhanced individual quality and skill to face

the struggle and challenges in their life (Barton et al., 2012). Other than that, recreational activity can increase life quality including improving physical function, good health, stress management, and enjoyment (Berger, 2007).

Table 2.2 Previous Research Related to This Study

Tittle Sample Size Results

(Mean/n)

of Malaya,

CHAPTER 3 METHODOLOGY 3.1 Participants and Selection Criteria

The participants recruited for this study are the students from University Sains Malaysia Kubang Kerian (USMKK).

The inclusion criteria:

• USMKK student

• Age between 18 to 40 years old.

The exclusion criteria:

• Have chronic health problem or injury

• Unable to perform activities 3.2 Sample Size Calculation

The sample size for this study was calculated using G*Power software (version 3.1.9.6). The total sample is 84.

t tests - Means: Difference between two independent means (two groups) Analysis: A priori: Compute required sample size

Input: Tail(s) = Two

Effect size d = 0.8

α err prob = 0.05

Power (1-β err prob) = 0.95 Allocation ratio N2/N1 = 1

Output: Noncentrality parameter δ = 3.6660606

Critical t = 1.9893186

Figure 3.1 Sample size calculation

3.3 Participant Recruitment and Location of Data Collection

All participants in this study were recruited voluntarily. The questionnaire was distributed online to all participants. This study was conducted at University Sains Malaysia Campus Kubang Kerian (USMKK).

3.4 Study Design

The study employed a cross-sectional design. The data was collected using the modified Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ).

3.5 Material

The questionnaire that was used for this study is the modified Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ). This questionnaire was developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2002. This questionnaire was developed to assess physical activity and sedentary behaviour. The GPAQ questionnaire was previously used to assess the students’ physical activity level (Shah, 2016).

3.6 Data Collection

The participants of this study were briefed about this study via online platform.

Students that meet the selection criteria voluntarily participated in this study. Data collected in this study were strictly confidential and will not publicize unless it is required by law. The consent form (Appendix D) was included in the Google form along with the questionnaire (Appendix A and B). After agreed with the consent form provided, the questionnaire was answered by participants using their available gadgets such as phones, laptops, or tablets. The link of the questionnaire was distributed to participants through

the online platform via WhatsApp, Telegram, Facebook, and Instagram. The participants answered the questionnaire at their own time and place. The questionnaire was distributed in early April until mid-Mei 2021, the participants answered the questionnaire once it was distributed. An online questionnaire was chosen for this research due to the current pandemic situation which is COVID-19 infection. This viral infection could be transmitted via direct or indirect contact with an infected person through their secretion including saliva, respiratory secretion, and droplets (Health et al., 2020). An online questionnaire is the safest way to reduce the risk of infection.

3.7 Statistical Analysis

All statistical analyses for this study were performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 26. Descriptive analysis was performed to determine student participation in recreational activities and to assess the percentage of student awareness about recreational activities. The p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. The result was reported in mean ± standard deviation (SD) and frequency.

3.10 Flowchart

Obtain approval from the USM Ethical Committee (Human)

GPAQ distribution (link for the Google form was sent through

online platform)

Data Analysis

SPSS v 26.0 (Descriptive analysis) Inclusion Criteria

Briefing the participants about the research through WhatsApp and obtain informed consent (Consent

form was sent through online platform)

CHAPTER 4 RESULTS

As shown in the Table 4.1, the total number of participants was 86 (N=86) with 29 male students and 57 female students.

Table 4.1 Total of the participant.

Gender n Percentage

Male 29 33.7

Female 57 66.3

Total 86 100.00

As shown in the Table 4.2, 80 participants were from School of Health Sciences, 5 participants from School of Medical Sciences and 1 participant from School of Dental Sciences.

Table 4.2 School of study

Frequency School of Health Sciences 80 School of Medical Sciences 5 School of Dental Sciences 1

Total 86

As shown in Table 4.3, Most of the participants that participated in this study were age 22 years old and the least age was 28 years old.

Table 4.3 Age of participants Age Frequency

20 9

21 12

22 38

23 13

24 5

25 3

26 3

27 2

28 1

Total 86

Table 4.2 shows that 38 out of 86 participants (44.2%) did not involve in vigorous-intensity outdoor recreational activities in a week while the other 48 (55.8%) participants did.

Table 4.2 Frequency of the participants involved in vigorous-intensity outdoor recreational activities.

Mean n % of Total n

none 1.76 38 44.2%

1 to 2 days, 5 to 10 minutes 1.70 10 11.6%

1 to 2 days, 15 to 20 minutes 1.89 9 10.5%

1 to 2 days, 25 to 30 minutes 1.50 10 11.6%

1 to 2 days, 45 to 50 minutes 1.67 3 3.5%

1 to 2 days, more than 1 hour 1.67 3 3.5%

3 to 4 days, 25 to 30 minutes 1.40 5 5.8%

3 to 4 days, 35 to 40 minutes 1.00 1 1.2%

3 to 4 days, more than 1 hour 1.00 1 1.2%

5 to 6 days, 25 to 30 minutes 1.00 1 1.2%

5 to 6 days, 35 to 40 minutes 1.50 2 2.3%

5 to 6 days, 45 to 50 minutes 1.00 1 1.2%

5 to 6 days, more than 1 hour 2.00 1 1.2%

7 day, 45 to 50 minutes 1.00 1 1.2%

Total 1.66 86 100.0%

Table 4.3 shows that 14 participants (16.3%) did not involve in moderate-intensity outdoor recreational activities while the other 72 participants (83.7%) involved in moderate-intensity outdoor recreational activities in a week.

Table 4.3 Frequency of the participants involved in moderate-intensity outdoor recreational activities.

Mean n % of Total n

none 1.71 14 16.3%

1 to 2 days, 5 to 10 minutes 1.78 9 10.5%

1 to 2 days, 15 to 20 minutes 1.75 12 14.0%

1 to 2 days, 25 to 30 minutes 1.60 10 11.6%

1 to 2 days, 35 to 40 minutes 2.00 3 3.5%

1 to 2 days, 45 to 50 minutes 2.00 2 2.3%

1 to 2 days, more than 1 hour 1.75 4 4.7%

3 to 4 days, 5 to 10 minutes 2.00 1 1.2%

3 to 4 days, 15 to 20 minutes 1.80 5 5.8%

3 to 4 days, 25 to 30 minutes 1.25 8 9.3%

3 to 4 days, 35 to 40 minutes 1.60 5 5.8%

3 to 4 days, 45 to 50 minutes 1.50 2 2.3%

5 to 6 days, 5 to 10 minutes 1.00 1 1.2%

5 to 6 days, 15 to 20 minutes 1.67 3 3.5%

5 to 6 days, 25 to 30 minutes 2.00 1 1.2%

5 to 6 days, 35 to 40 minutes 1.50 2 2.3%

5 to 6 days, 45 to 50 minutes 1.00 1 1.2%

7 day, 5 to 10 minutes 2.00 1 1.2%

7 day, 25 to 30 minutes 1.50 2 2.3%

Table 4.4 shows 46 participants (53.5%) did not involve in vigorous-intensity indoor recreational activities while the other 40 participants (46.5%) involved in vigorous-intensity indoor recreational activities in a week.

Table 4.4 Frequency of the participants involved in vigorous-intensity indoor recreational activities.

Mean n % of Total n

none 1.78 46 53.5%

1 to 2 days, 5 to 10 minutes 1.67 9 10.5%

1 to 2 days, 15 to 20 minutes 1.43 7 8.1%

1 to 2 days, 25 to 30 minutes 1.83 6 7.0%

1 to 2 days, 45 to 50 minutes 1.00 1 1.2%

1 to 2 days, more than 1 hour 1.00 2 2.3%

3 to 4 days, 5 to 10 minutes 2.00 1 1.2%

3 to 4 days, 25 to 30 minutes 1.50 4 4.7%

3 to 4 days, 35 to 40 minutes 1.40 5 5.8%

3 to 4 days, more than 1 hour 1.00 1 1.2%

5 to 6 days, 35 to 40 minutes 1.50 2 2.3%

5 to 6 days, 45 to 50 minutes 1.00 1 1.2%

5 to 6 days, more than 1 hour 2.00 1 1.2%

Total 1.66 86 100.0%